CCAS Dean Ben Vinson III

Ben Vinson Takes the Helm at Columbian College

Ben Vinson III is thrilled to be in Washington, leading GW’s largest school, shaping strategy across the arts and sciences, and joining the dynamism of a university in the heart of the nation’s capital. He’s energized by the idea of working at the nexus of academia and policy, watching knowledge transfer from the school into real-life practice. But there’s another, more lighthearted, reason behind Vinson’s excitement: Despite his years at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore— a city pulsating with Raven and Oriole mania— the new dean is a diehard D.C. sports fan. Read More

Features

Shaping Mathematics

Shaping Mathematics Literally and Figuratively

From the time he was 7 years old and his father brought home a thick library book about origami, Lowell Abrams has been fascinated by how shapes can be folded and fit together. Legos, Tinkertoys, and other construction sets also captured his childhood imagination. Today an associate professor of mathematics, Abrams still builds with small models and collections of various pieces and shapes on his desk, but now he does it to help with abstract ideas.

Dean Ben Vinson speaking with students

Ben Vinson Takes the Helm at Columbian College

Ben Vinson III is thrilled to be in Washington, leading GW’s largest school, shaping strategy across the arts and sciences, and joining the dynamism of a university in the heart of the nation’s capital. He’s energized by the idea of working at the nexus of academia and policy, watching knowledge transfer from the school into real-life practice.

Done flying in sky

Drones

Imagine a robot flying with a gun, chasing an elderly woman into an alley, and ordering her to drop her purse. Terrified, she complies and runs away. The robot then swoops down, scoops up the purse, and takes off in flight. In debates about the proliferation of drones—the informal name for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)—there is much concern about privacy rights but much less discussion about how criminals might use them.